Aldeburgh... fresh fish nearly every day
Cherries from the side of the road...
The ceviche pop up with Martin Morales
Camp-fire cooking
Fetes and Festivals
Markets and home grown vegetables...
A field of oil seed rape
Delicious home-made food
  • Cafe and tea rooms
Saturday, 28 May 2016 15:41

No long haired lefties at The Tickell Arms

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Last time I ate at The Tickell Arms in Whittlesford there was a sign on the door saying 'no long haired lefties'. That was in 1981. Nowadays the pub is part of the CambsCuisine Group and is much more accommodating. Dogs are welcome (in the pub) and long haired lefties are allowed in too. I ate duck breast with pearl barley, roasted red onions, parsnip puree and port sauce. Very good it was too!

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Thursday, 26 May 2016 16:48

Giggling Squid's tentacles trail to Bury.

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This week we had a sneak preview inside Bury's newest restaurant The Giggling Squid. Prosecco was flowing at the opening party and canapes included this delicious salt and pepper squid. We loved the decor. Lots of orchids on a back drop of hand picked drift wood with atmospheric lighting. Upcycled mirrors and a huge bookcase of over 2000 books from the local Oxfam for those that fancy a browse. We are going back to sample the menu which includes seafood, street food and simple rustic Thai food all made in house. We are not sure if all the food is going to be elaborately garnished but loved watching the fruit and veggie carving at the opening party.

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Wednesday, 25 May 2016 11:30

Lady Bakewell-Park

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Lady Bakewell-Park (aka Becky Sebright-King) produces baked goods using locally sourced ingredients wherever possible. Find her in the Cookhouse at Suffolk Food Hall. Order your own personalised, hand-made biscuits online.

Thursday, 19 May 2016 14:47

Picon Biere

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The perfect pre-drink drink. Drink on a hot summers day, after cutting the grass.  Mix the French bitters with pilsner or a wheat beer for a perfect apertif. Or nip to Duck Soup in Soho and enjoy with a plate of green beans, anchovy, soft boiled egg and sour dough crumbs.

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Thursday, 19 May 2016 14:11

An exciting breakfast

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Darsham Nurseries. The best and most interesting breakfast I have eaten for a long time. Shakshuka ... baked eggs in spiced tomato and pepper stew with feta cheese and lots of lovely fresh herbs including my favourite dill.

 

 

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Thursday, 05 May 2016 08:16

Eat Cambridge

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If you find yourself in the Cambridge area in the next two weeks check out Eat Cambridge. Lots on! Lots to eat!

Tuesday, 26 April 2016 10:46

And the winners are ....

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What a job! Judging for the 2016 EADT Food and Drink Awards was no mean feat. Such difficult decisions to make to whittle down the entry list of fabulous foodies, all from Suffolk, all championing the vibrant and exciting local food scene. It was an honour to take part and judge both the Customer Service Award and The Best Cafe/Tea Room Award. Pictured above are Hannah Huntley and Beth Cook from the gorgeous and now award winning Applaud Cafe. Fellow judge and sponsor Charlotte Smith-Jarvis on the right, presents the award. Take a look at all the wonderful winners and finalists.

Sunday, 24 April 2016 22:20

Fried cod cheeks and cauliflower affogato

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The worst dish I have encountered in a Suffolk restaurant this month. Not saying where!

My name is Mrs Madumbi. I am a new occasional contributor to Suffolk Foodie. My focus, though by no means not exclusively, will be on food from Africa. Guess what I found in a Tesco in Sheffield? - amaDumbe. You could mistake this rather ugly, occasionally hairy, vegetable for a mutant potato, but it has a delicate taste of its own - like no other. The amaDumbe, more commonly called madumbi in South Africa, is called eddoes in the Caribbean and Tesco, and taro elsewhere. Do remember this plant can be toxic in its raw form. Madumbis are usually peeled before cooking and can be boiled or steamed, whole or cubed. As a child growing up in southern Africa I loved this vegetable. It was always boiled in its skin for 20/25 minutes (depending on size) until the fleshy part gave when pricked with a fork. After cooking, the water was drained and discarded. The skin comes away easily once cooked. The rather grey inside of the madumbi has a nutty, slightly sweet taste (think distant cousin of sweet potato). The texture can appear slimey and unusual but it is not, so please do not be put off.  Newcomers quickly acquire a taste for this versatile little tuber. It is delicious served simply 'potato style' with salt and butter. It can be mashed and mixed with caramalised onions or leeks; added to soups and curry dishes; sliced thinly with a mandolin for crisps and oven-baked or fried.

Monday, 18 April 2016 16:40

Herb butter

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We had a big family celebration party at the weekend and ended up with a fridge full of leftovers, including a load of butter and selection of fresh herbs. So we made herb butter. This is how ... Snap off any thick stalks, wash and dry the herbs in a salad spinner to remove excess water. Break large pieces of room temperature butter into smaller pieces and drop evenly into the blender. Whizz for a few minutes and if needed gently poke the butter down into the herbs with a plastic spoon. You will need to do this if the butter is too cold and hard. The butter should mix evenly with the herbs. Spoon the mixture onto grease proof paper and roll into a sausage shape. Twist the ends of the paper to seal. If you want to store the herb butter in smaller quantities cut into discs once the butter has hardened in the fridge. Repack in grease proof paper and store in a plastic tub in the deep freeze until required. Remember to label the packages.Parsley gives a wonderful green tint to the mixture. The butter can be smeared on meat before barbequeing, or on grilled fish and steak. Mint is slightly less verdant than parsley but the butter is delicious added to omlettes or mixed into peas. Dill butter goes wonderfully well with salmon - and is also a great accompaniment to gently scrambled eggs. Add zest of lemon to your dill butter for extra flavour. If you don't have any pesto add basil butter to pasta dishes. Your favourite herb butter can be used to add flavour to jacket potatoes or spread onto warm bread.

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